festival Tublay

Tublay’s foundation day focuses on 1st coffee festival

by Ofelia C. Empian 


Recognizing the gains drawn from the coffee plant, Tublay launched the first coffee festival as part of its 115th foundation celebration last week with the theme, “Intensifying local coffee industry in enhancing climate disaster resiliency.” 

Coffee is regarded not only for its economic contribution but also as a means of combating the effects of climate change, according to Mayor Reuben Paoad. 

Aside from its impact to the local economy, the town also uses the plant as a disaster mitigating crop. 

Paoad said the Municipal Agriculture Office and the Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction Management Office are in charge of the town’s coffee industry.

He said Tublay, as one of the countrysides of the Baguio-La Trinidad-Itogon-Sablan-Tuba-Tublay (BLISTT) area, should focus on regreening its environment and one way of doing this is by planting coffee. 

Paoad said of the town’s 10,260 hectares total land area, only about one percent is agricultural. 

“I hope we can make our lands productive while beautifying our environment,” Paoad said. 

The community already planted around 395 hectares of coffee plants, with various organizations such as Sayatan Coffee Farmer’s Association, Citizen’s of Ambongdolan for the Revitalization of the Environment, Ba-ayan Organic Farmer’s Association, Bawi-Tacarang Community and Caponga Cluster, among others. 

The different farmer’s group joined the forum conducted during the event, along with various skills competition such as coffee roasting, packing, and sorting. 

To aid them in improving coffee production, the town received one unit of coffee huller with polisher, one coffee roaster, one coffee grinder, one rod type moisture meter, three units weighing scales and three foot sealers.

The equipment were turned over to the Tublay Organic Farmers Practitioners Association through the assistance of the Department of Trade and Industry-Benguet and the Department of Social Welfare and Development. 

Municipal Agricultural Officer Jeffrey Sotero said the new equipment can help the community shorten the processing time by three times of that spent in coffee manual production.

Source: Midland issue, November 22, 2015